Bordeaux Love Dictionary - Alain Juppé

Bordeaux Love Dictionary - Alain Juppé

SKU: 9782259212298
€25.00Price
  • Author (s): Alain Juppé
  • Publisher: Plon
  • Collection: DICTIONARY IN LOVE
  • Publication: 18/10/2018
  • Number of books: 1
  • Shipping: 662
  • Dimensions: 20.20 x 13.40 x 3.40

Summary :
Bordeaux seen by the craftsman of its revival. I was not born in Bordeaux. My hometown is Mont-de Marsan, the capital of the Landes department, about 120 km south of Bordeaux. I lived there all my childhood and adolescence. And Bordeaux in all of this? My paternal grandparents lived in Bordeaux. We visited them, my parents, my sister and I, from time to time. I have few memories of it. At the start of each school year, my mother dragged us, my sister and I, to Mod, the chic boutique on the Place de la Comédie where she dressed us for the winter. She didn't really like Bordeaux. We moved to Bordeaux, Isabelle and I, in 1994. We found the house of our dreams, in an old building in the Impasse des Tanneries. We were happy there. I foolishly sold this house in 2004 on a whim. I was in shock at my conviction and needed a break. Here we are today in the heart of the city, between two strategic sites: the Mollat bookstore and the Palais Rohan. What a joy to walk every morning to my office at the Hôtel de Ville. I think back to the city as it was over two decades ago. She was certainly already beautiful, but she had dozed off. The sleeping beauty, they said. Tourists passing through it on the Bright South Path found it black and did not stop there. She was black indeed. She put a sort of coquetry into it. When I launched my first cleansing campaign, I remember that a Bordeaux writer was distressed, in the press, to see the city of soot fade away ... and its very particular poetry. Very quickly the people of Bordeaux realized that cutting back was also restoring buildings that often needed it; that it was above all revealing the details of an architecture hidden under the filth. The contagion quickly played out and the Bordelais rediscovered their city. In presenting my first urban project, I had two guiding ideas: first, to provide the agglomeration with modern and powerful public transport to prevent the emerging congestion of travel; and reconquer or conquer the two banks of the Garonne to open up Bordeaux resolutely on its river. The left bank had been deserted by the port which had left only ruined hangars. As for the right bank, it was still, for the classic Bordelais, an almost unknown space, another world that one did not frequent. Obscure taboo? Unwritten law? JM Planes asks himself in his booklet on Quinconces. The times have changed. The tram has become a sort of umbilical cord between the left bank and the right bank, which is no longer the shriveled kidney in the meander of the river which JM Planes spoke of in another text. The stone bridge now reserved for public transport and gentle travel accommodates up to 10,000 cyclists per day and a swarm of pedestrians. The development of the quays is popular. It has transformed a no man's land into a place of daily life frequented by the inhabitants of the city and the metropolis as well as by tourists. What a joy for me to meet happy citizens there, and proud of their city! .